This exhibition has been conceived in a very specific place: the garden of Gulbenkian in Lisbon. Designed by António Viana Barreto and Gonçalo Ribeiro Telle in the 60’s, the garden surrounds currently the building where the dream of Calouste Gulbenkian is taking shape each day. The exhibition offers as it is inspired literally dreams of filmmakers and playwrights, poets and writers. Their dreams were set to music by the German musician F. M. Einheit and then registered in the Foundation and in its garden, thanks to the contribution of many of the musicians and of the Choir, Gulbenkian, throughout 2017.

An interesting dialogue is offered here: the dream and the immateriality of the exposure and the materiality are very practical for an institution such as the Gulbenkian Foundation. The architecture, the institution, the garden, according to the words of the curator Mathieu Copeland to come ” fill in the exhibition and, in return, the exhibition uses the institution “. The dream – as a manifestation of the desires and fears (read Freudian), support of the voice of the unconscious mind (sometimes the voices of the other world), but also a tool of creation, the dream as the constitutive element of mythologies – is the unifying thread of this exhibition. At the same time, the geometrical abstractions (see Almada Negreiros) or mystics (the mandalas, diagrams, symbolic that play a role in many religious traditions, or even in the school Jungian psychology) are of great importance here.

 

The Dreams of  Gabriel Abrantes, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, FM Einheit, Tim Etchells, Alexandre Estrela, Susie Green, David Link, Pierre Paulin, Emilie Pitoiset, Lee Ranaldo, Susan Stenger and Apichatpong Weerasethakul

Interpreted by FM Einheit with Volker Kamp, Robert Poss, Susan Stenger, Erika Stucky, Saskia von Klitzing and the singers of the Choir Gulbenkian

Played through the Mandalas of José de Almada Negreiros, Philippe Decrauzat, Myriam Gourfink, Olivier Mosset and Eduardo Terrazas

Curated by Mathieu Copeland

 

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